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Wilwarin

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'''Wilwarin''' was one of the [[constellations]] of [[Arda]].
 
'''Wilwarin''' was one of the [[constellations]] of [[Arda]].
  
Wilwarin was created by the [[Valar|Vala]] [[Varda]]. It was set in the heavens of [[Arda]] to welcome and give light to the [[Elves]], who had just awoken in [[Cuiviénen]].<ref>''[[The Silmarillion]]'', [[Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor]]</ref>
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Wilwarin was created by the [[Valar|Vala]] [[Varda]]. It was set in the heavens of [[Arda]] to welcome and give light to the [[Elves]], who had just awoken in [[Cuiviénen]].<ref>[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[Christopher Tolkien]] (ed.), ''[[The Silmarillion]]'', "[[Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor]]"</ref>
  
[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] gave no description of the constellation, nor any counterpart in our modern-day constellations, but [[Christopher Tolkien]] suggested that it could be the commonly-known constellation [[Wikipedia:Cassiopeia_(constellation)|Cassiopeia]].<ref>''[[The Silmarillion]]'', Index of Names</ref> Cassiopeia is a plausible candidate for being Wilwarin as its "W"-shape is a reasonable match to that of a butterfly.
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[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] gave no description of the constellation, nor any counterpart in our modern-day constellations, but [[Christopher Tolkien]] suggested that it could be the commonly-known constellation [[Wikipedia:Cassiopeia_(constellation)|Cassiopeia]].<ref>[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[Christopher Tolkien]] (ed.), ''[[The Silmarillion]]'', "Index of Names"</ref> Cassiopeia is a plausible candidate for being Wilwarin as its "W"-shape is a reasonable match to that of a butterfly.
  
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
''Wilwarin'' (''wilwarind-'', pl. ''wilwarindi'') means "butterfly" in [[Quenya]].<ref name="etym-wil">''[[The Lost Road and Other Writings]]'', The Etymologies</ref>
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''Wilwarin'' (''wilwarind-'', pl. ''wilwarindi'') means "butterfly" in [[Quenya]].<ref name="etym-wil">[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[Christopher Tolkien]] (ed.), ''[[The Lost Road and Other Writings]]'', "[[Etymologies|The Etymologies]]", entry ''WIL-'', pp. 398-9</ref>
  
 
''Wilwarin'' comes from the same root (''wil-'', "fly, float in air") as the name for the Ring of Air, ''[[Vilya]]'', and shares this common root with the Sindarin word ''[[gwilith]]'', "air".<ref name="etym-wil"/>
 
''Wilwarin'' comes from the same root (''wil-'', "fly, float in air") as the name for the Ring of Air, ''[[Vilya]]'', and shares this common root with the Sindarin word ''[[gwilith]]'', "air".<ref name="etym-wil"/>
  
 
==Other versions of the legendarium==
 
==Other versions of the legendarium==
In early versions of [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]]'s notes, the name of the constellation is "Vilvarin".<ref>''[[Morgoth's Ring]]'', The Later [[Quenta Silmarillion]], pp. 160, 166</ref>
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In early versions of [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]]'s notes, the name of the constellation is "Vilvarin".<ref>[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[Christopher Tolkien]] (ed.), ''[[Morgoth's Ring]]'', "The Later [[Quenta Silmarillion]]", pp. 160, 166</ref>
  
==References==
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From other published writings, we know of a few other forms of the word ''wilwarin''. The words ''wilwarindëa'' and ''wilwarindië'' (older [[Qenya]] form was ''wilwarindeën''<ref name="matc">[[J.R.R. Tolkien]], ''[[The Monsters and the Critics]]'', "A Secret Vice", pp. 213, 216, 220</ref>) are the respective singular and plural forms meaning "like a ''wilwarin'' or butterfly".<ref>[[J.R.R. Tolkien]], "Early Elvish Poetry" in [[Christopher Gilson]] (ed.), ''[[Parma Eldalamberon]]'', [[Parma Eldalamberon 16|vol. 16]], 2006, p. 96</ref> We also know of the Qenya form ''wilwarindon'', "as a butterfly".<ref name="matc"/>
<references/>
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[[Category:Constellations]]
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==References==
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<small><references/></small>
 
[[Category:Butterflies]]
 
[[Category:Butterflies]]
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[[Category:Constellations]]
 
[[Category:Quenya words]]
 
[[Category:Quenya words]]
  
[[fr:encyclo:geographie:astronomie:wilwarin]]
 
 
[[de:Wilwarin]]
 
[[de:Wilwarin]]
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[[fr:encyclo:geographie:astronomie:wilwarin]]
 
[[fi:Wilwarin]]
 
[[fi:Wilwarin]]
  
 
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Revision as of 23:49, 10 September 2008

Wilwarin was one of the constellations of Arda.

Wilwarin was created by the Vala Varda. It was set in the heavens of Arda to welcome and give light to the Elves, who had just awoken in Cuiviénen.[1]

J.R.R. Tolkien gave no description of the constellation, nor any counterpart in our modern-day constellations, but Christopher Tolkien suggested that it could be the commonly-known constellation Cassiopeia.[2] Cassiopeia is a plausible candidate for being Wilwarin as its "W"-shape is a reasonable match to that of a butterfly.

Etymology

Wilwarin (wilwarind-, pl. wilwarindi) means "butterfly" in Quenya.[3]

Wilwarin comes from the same root (wil-, "fly, float in air") as the name for the Ring of Air, Vilya, and shares this common root with the Sindarin word gwilith, "air".[3]

Other versions of the legendarium

In early versions of Tolkien's notes, the name of the constellation is "Vilvarin".[4]

From other published writings, we know of a few other forms of the word wilwarin. The words wilwarindëa and wilwarindië (older Qenya form was wilwarindeën[5]) are the respective singular and plural forms meaning "like a wilwarin or butterfly".[6] We also know of the Qenya form wilwarindon, "as a butterfly".[5]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien and Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien and Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names"
  3. 3.0 3.1 J.R.R. Tolkien and Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "The Etymologies", entry WIL-, pp. 398-9
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien and Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Morgoth's Ring, "The Later Quenta Silmarillion", pp. 160, 166
  5. 5.0 5.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Monsters and the Critics, "A Secret Vice", pp. 213, 216, 220
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Early Elvish Poetry" in Christopher Gilson (ed.), Parma Eldalamberon, vol. 16, 2006, p. 96