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Gróin

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Gróin
Dwarf
Biographical Information
LocationLonely Mountain
LanguageKhuzdul
BirthT.A. 2671
Lonely Mountain
Death2923 (aged 242)
Family
HouseHouse of Durin
ParentageFarin
SiblingsFundin
ChildrenÓin, Glóin
Physical Description
GenderMale

Gróin (Third Age 2671 - 2923, 242 years old) was a Dwarf of the Longbeards.

Contents

[edit] History

Gróin was an important figure in the royal genealogies of the Dwarves, Gróin was the grandson of Borin, the younger son of King Náin II, and so could claim direct descent from Durin the Deathless himself. In his turn, Gróin was the younger brother of Fundin, father to Óin and Glóin, and uncle to Balin and Dwalin, all four of whom travelled on the Quest of Erebor.[1]

Through his son Glóin, he was also grandfather to Gimli Elf-friend of the Company of the Ring. For all his genealogical importance, though, we know almost nothing of his life. His dates of birth and death, though, show us that he was alive at the time of Smaug's Sack of Erebor, and the War of the Dwarves and Orcs twenty-nine years later. It is likely that he was present at both these events.

[edit] Etymology

Jim Allan has suggested that Gróin (like Grór) is derived from Old Norse gróa ("to grow"), thus meaning "Growing-one".[2]

[edit] Genealogy

 
 
 
 
 
Náin II
2338 - 2585
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dáin I
2440 - 2589
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Borin
2450 - 2711
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thrór
2542 - 2790
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Farin
2560 - 2803
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thráin II
2644 - 2850
 
 
 
Fundin
2662 - 2799
 
 
 
 
 
GRÓIN
2671 - 2923
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thorin
2746 - 2941
 
Balin
2763 - 2994
 
Dwalin
2772 - Fo.A. 91
 
Óin
2774 - 2994
 
Glóin
2783 - Fo.A. 15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gimli
2879 - Fo.A. 120+

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "Durin's Folk"
  2. Jim Allan, "Giving of Names", in An Introduction to Elvish, p. 225