Laer Cú Beleg

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Laer cu Beleg by Šárka Škorpíková

Laer Cú Beleg was a song that was made by Túrin in memory of his friend Beleg Cúthalion.[1]

History[edit]

With the aid of Gwindor, Beleg freed Turin from Orc captivity during a thunderstorm. Upon being freed, however, Turin accidentally mistook Beleg for an Orc and murdered him with Beleg's own sword, Anglachel. Upon realizing the horror of what he had just done, Turin fell into a frozen state of shock and allowed himself to be led by Gwindor to the Pools of Ivrin. Once there, he drank from the pure waters and was healed. After which, he cried in tears, mourning Beleg. Then he composed and sang a lament as a form of release in his grief, singing it aloud regardless of peril.[2]

Etymology[edit]

Laer Cú Beleg is Sindarin for "Song of the Great Bow",[2] from laer ("song"), ("bow") and beleg ("great, mighty; large, big").[3]

Other versions of the legendarium[edit]

The concept of Túrin composing an elegy for his friend is present since early stages of the legendarium. Appears for first time in The Lay of the Children of Húrin, in which it is called the Bowman's Friendship, and it is said that the Gnomes remembered it in Nargothrond and was a song used in battles against Morgoth.[4] The same name is given to it in the following versions of the story in the Sketch of the Mythology[5] and the Quenta Noldorinwa.[6]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names", entry "Laer Cú Beleg"
  2. 2.0 2.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Death of Beleg"
  3. Paul Strack, "S. Laer Cú Beleg pn.", Eldamo (accessed 17 August 2022)
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lays of Beleriand, "I. The Lay of the Children of Húrin: III. Failivrin", p. 64, vv. 1662-1665
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Shaping of Middle-earth, "II. The Earliest 'Silmarillion' (The 'Sketch of the Mythology')", [Section] 12, p. 29
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Shaping of Middle-earth, "III. The Quenta: [Section] 12", p. 124