Song of Parting

From Tolkien Gateway
Beren: Song of Parting by Ted Nasmith

The Song of Parting was Beren Erchamion's song of farewell to Lúthien Tinúviel. It was sung by him in the Lay of Leithian as he left her for Angband, even as he looked across Anfauglith.[1] It is arguably among the best parts of the Lay, as a part of it was included in the Quenta Silmarillion.[2]

In The Silmarillion[edit | edit source]

A part of the song is given in the Chapter 19 "Of Beren and Lúthien" of The Silmarillion. This is also included in the third edition of the The Road Goes Ever On, as the 9th song, with music by Donald Swann.

Farewell sweet earth and northern sky,
for ever blest, since here did lie
and here with lissom limbs did run
beneath the Moon, beneath the Sun,
Lúthien Tinúviel
more fair than mortal tongue can tell.
Though all to ruin fell the world
and were dissolved and backward hurled
unmade into the old abyss,
yet were its making good, for this—
the dawn, the dusk, the earth, the sea—
that Lúthien on a time should be!

In The Lays of Beleriand[edit | edit source]

The full song is given in The Lays of Beleriand, part III "The Lay of Leithian: Canto XI".

    Farewell now here, ye leaves of trees,
your music in the morning breeze!
Farewell now blade and bloom and grass
that see the changing seasons pass;
ye waters murmuring over stone,
and meres that silent stand alone!
Farewell now mountain, vale, and plain!
Farewell now wind and frost and rain,
and mist and cloud, and heaven's air;
ye star and moon so blinding-fair
that still shall look down from the sky
on the wide earth, though Beren die—
though Beren die not, and yet deep,
deep, whence comes of those that weep
no dreadful echo, lie and choke
in everlasting dark and smoke.
    Farewell sweet earth and northern sky,
for ever blest, since here did lie,
and here with lissom limbs did run,
beneath the moon, beneath the sun,
Lúthien Tinúviel
more fair than mortal tongue can tell.
Though all to ruin fell the world,
and were dissolved and backward hurled
unmade into the old abyss,
yet were its making good, for this—
the dawn, the dusk, the earth, the sea—
that Lúthien on a time should be!

References