Lalaith

From Tolkien Gateway
This article is about Urwen, sister of Turin. For the Ainu from The Book of Lost Tales, see Arien.
Urwen Lalaith
Adan
"Lalaith" by Ted Nasmith
Biographical Information
Other namesLalaith
LocationDor-lómin
BirthF.A. 466
Dor-lómin
DeathF.A. 469, Evil Breath (aged 3)
Dor-lómin
Family
HouseHouse of Hador
ParentageHúrin & Morwen
SiblingsTúrin & Nienor
Physical Description
GenderFemale
Hair colorBlonde
GalleryImages of Urwen Lalaith

Urwen, also called Lalaith, was the second child of Húrin and Morwen, sister of Túrin and Nienor.[1]

History

Urwen was a happy child and her parents gave her the nickname "Laughter" (Lalaith), from the nearby river, Nen Lalaith. Her presence in the house of Húrin brought much joy to Dor-lómin that she was often compared to Elven children by most people. Túrin, her older brother, loved his sister, but preferred watching her unseen rather than playing with her as she ran and sang. She was three years old when she died of the Evil Breath sent out from Angband.[2]

Legacy

After recovering of his ill, Túrin was ordered by his nurse to never mention Lalaith again, and speak of Urwen instead. His mother explained laughter had died in their home, blaming the Enemy.[2] Urwen's death was especially hard on Túrin, who always looked for her likeness in women ever after,[3] which is shown by how he considers Finduilas to be similar to how he imagined an older Urwen.[4]

Etymology

Urwen is Sindarin, but it is not glossed, although it is clearly the combination of the elements ûr ("fire, hot") + gwenn ("maiden").[5]

Her nickname, lalaith, is a Sindarin noun meaning "laughter".[6]

Genealogy

 
 
Bregolas
 
 
 
Halmir
 
Hador Lórindol
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belegund
 
Baragund
 
Hareth
 
Galdor of Dor-lómin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Morwen Eledhwen
 
Húrin Thalion
 
Huor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Túrin Turambar
 
URWEN LALAITH
 
Nienor Níniel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

References