Velindo

From Tolkien Gateway
Velindo
Fay
Biographical Information
Other namesGwilion (G)
Wéland/Welund (OE)
LocationValinor
Great Lands
AffiliationAulë (formerly)
Physical Description
GenderMale

Velindo was a fay of Aulë's folk, according to the early version of the legendarium associated with The Book of Lost Tales.[1]

History[edit]

Velindo was sent by Aulë into the world in order to fetch "some of the good heavy red gold of the dwarves". However, there he grew prideful due to the adoration of the Dwarves and Men owing to his skills as a craftsman. Therefore, he never returned to Aulë, but rather set up on his own - and he grew famous, but as the Elves faded so did his own power and fame, yet he never became wicked.

Ages later, Eriol asked Rúmil if the person of Wéland, a renowned smith in the Germanic legend, is the same as Aulë, but Rúmil corrected him, saying rather that Wéland is actually Velindo.[1]

Etymology[edit]

According to Paul Strack, the name Velindo is in Qenya, with Gwilion[1] being its Gnomish equivalent - however, their meaning is unclear.[2]

The two names (Velindo and Gwilion) might have been derived from the roots GWILI ("fly")[3] or VILI ("air"),[4] possibly in reference to the real-world mythology surrounding Wayland, where he fashioned his own wings in order to escape his captivity.[5] See also: Varavilindo.[note 1]

Velindo's name in Old English was Wéland[1] or Welund.[6]

Other versions of the legendarium[edit]

In another contemporary text, the Germanic smith Wéland is instead identified with the Gnome Fëanor.

That text depicts an outline of a story placed during the wars of the Elves with Melko, in which Fëanor was captured by a man called Niðad[note 2], King of the Niaroth. However, Fëanor killed Niðad's sons[note 3] and managed to escape by crafting artificial wings for himself; he also made love to the king's daughter Beaduhilde and fled with her, but ultimately lost her in woods.

Eventually Beaduhilde (who was now pregnant) forgave Fëanor, and in spite of her father's wrath at her pregnancy, she still managed to obtain Niðad's blessing upon her son.[6]

See also[edit]

Notes

  1. The potential explanation of the names Velindo and Gwilion is pure speculation on the part of this article's author.
  2. In the text as originally written, Niðad was a replacement for Melko, and the Niaroth for Orcs.
  3. In the original text, Fëanor killed Melko's "captain of orcs", instead of Niðad's sons.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Sí Qente Feanor and Other Elvish Writings", in Parma Eldalamberon XV (edited by Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), "Early Runic Documents", ER1d: Fourth page, p. 96
  2. Paul Strack, "ᴱQ. Velindo m.", Eldamo - An Elvish Lexicon (accessed 26 June 2022)
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne), entry GWILI, p. 104
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne), entry VILI, p. 101
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Sí Qente Feanor and Other Elvish Writings", in Parma Eldalamberon XV (edited by Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), "Early Runic Documents", Commentary on ER1, p. 101
  6. 6.0 6.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Sí Qente Feanor and Other Elvish Writings", in Parma Eldalamberon XV (edited by Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), "Early Runic Documents", ER1f: Sixth and seventh pages, p. 97