High feast

From Tolkien Gateway
This article describes a concept which is mentioned in J.R.R. Tolkien's works, but was never given a definite name.
High feast
Event
LocationValinor
Part ofWorship of Eru
ParticipantsValar, Maiar, parts of the Elves

The high feast was a feast that Manwë made in praise of Eru to celebrate each gathering of fruits. For this feast, the Valar and Maiar were bidden to come to the halls of Manwë and Varda. Just before the Darkening of Valinor, a feast was held to which also the Vanyar and Noldor came, and they sang together with the Maiar before Manwë and Varda.[1]

Alternate names used for this event include the great festival,[2] autumn feast,[2] and high festival.[3]

High feast of 1495

During great high feast of Y.T. 1495, Manwë sought to heal the rifts between the houses of the Noldor.

To Fëanor, dwelling at Formenos following his banishment, Manwë had sent the following message of invite: "Fëanor son of Finwë, come and do not deny my bidding! In my love thou remainest and wilt be honoured in my hall."[4] Fëanor did come to the feast, but only because he had read Manwë's message as a command;[5] he wore no raiment of festival or ornaments, and denied sight of his Silmarils by keeping them locked back in Formenos.[1] Finwë would not come and remained in Formenos, stating that "While the ban lasts upon Fëanor my son, that he may not go to Túna, I hold myself unkinged, and will not meet my people, nor those that rule in my stead."[6] With Finwë remained the sons of Fëanor[5] along with the other Noldor residing at Formenos.[1]

Fëanor was reconciled, in word, with Fingolfin before the throne of Manwë after Fingolfin held forth his hand and stated: "As I promised, I do now. I release thee, and remember no grievance." Fëanor took his hand and remained silent, with Fingolfin then adding: "Half-brother in blood, full brother in heart will I be. Thou shalt lead and I will follow. May no new grief divide us." to which Fëanor replied "I hear thee, so be it."[1]

It was told that in this very hour Melkor and Ungoliant destroyed the Two Trees.[1]

Other versions of the legendarium

In the earliest version of the legendarium in The Book of Lost Tales, the corresponding event is the Samírien, which means "Feast of Double Mirth" in Qenya. Christopher Tolkien noted that the name was "Presumably derive from the root MIRI ‘smile’, sa- is referred to in QL as an ‘intensive prefix’."[7]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Darkening of Valinor"
  2. 2.0 2.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Shaping of Middle-earth, "II. The Earliest 'Silmarillion': Commentary on the 'Sketch of the Mythology'", p. 30
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Shaping of Middle-earth, "III. The Quenta", p. 57
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Morgoth's Ring, "Part Three. The Later Quenta Silmarillion: (II) The Second Phase: Of the Darkening of Valinor", §58a
  5. 5.0 5.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Morgoth's Ring, "Part Three. The Later Quenta Silmarillion: (II) The Second Phase: Of the Darkening of Valinor", §58c
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Morgoth's Ring, "Part Two. The Annals of Aman: Fourth section of the Annals of Aman", §112
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, Appendix: Names in the Lost Tales – Part I, p. 345