The Wold

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The Wold
Region
"The Plains of Rohan" by Alan Lee
General Information
LocationNorthern part of the Eastemnet of Rohan
TypeRegion
DescriptionGrassy uplands
InhabitantsMen

The Wold was the northern part of the Eastemnet of Rohan,[1] windy upland[2] plains[3] between Fangorn Forest and the Anduin, bordered to the north by the Limlight.[4][3][5] The Wold was famous for its grass where the Rohirrim grazed their herds.[3]

History

Prior to the late years of the Second Age the Wold was part of no kingdom; the Elves of Lórien never claimed any land south of the Limlight as part of their realm. When the kingdom of Gondor was established in S.A. 3320,[6] the Wold became part of its province Calenardhon.[7]

After victory in the War of the Last Alliance, Isildur, his nephew Meneldil, and a company of trusted friends rode about the borders of Gondor. The Wold was one of their last stops before they journeyed to Amon Anwar where the tomb of Elendil was made.[8]

In T.A. 2510 the Wold was invaded by a host of the Balchoth who crossed over the Anduin from the Brown Lands. At the same time Orcs descended upon the Wold from the Misty Mountains in the west. The Ruling Steward Cirion sent messengers north to seek aid and then led Gondor's northern army to repel the invaders. This army had been driven into the Field of Celebrant and was facing annihilation when Eorl the Young and his mounted host burst upon the rear of the enemy. The invaders fled across the Limlight and were hunted by Eorl's riders across the Wold.[9]

Rohan

It was after that victory when Calenardhon, including the Wold, was given to Eorl's people and became an independent kingdom. However, in 2545 Easterlings once more attempted to invade the area and King Eorl of the Rohirrim fell in battle in the Wold.[10]

The main inhabitants were nomadic Men of Rohan who used the land to graze cattle, although during the years up to the War of the Ring the land had become deserted due to orc-raids.[3]

In July 3018 the Nazgûl passed northward across the Wold as they began searching for the land of the Hobbits. They returned to the Wold in September empty-handed, where they met messengers from Sauron with orders to ride in haste to Isengard.[11]

From 18[3] to 20[3] February 3019[12] the Fellowship of the Ring passed by the eastern edge of the Wold as they coursed down the Anduin.[3] Later that month the Fellowship was broken and first the Uruk-hai, who had captured Merry and Pippin,[13] followed by the Three Hunters, skirted the western edge of the Wold as they raced towards Fangorn Forest. It was here that Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli met Éomer, who was riding back after destroying the Orcs who had crossed the northern plains of Rohan.[14]

During the War of the Ring, the Wold was invaded by Orcs[15][16] from the north on 11 March T.A. 3019,[17] but the Ents defeated the invading Orcs on the next day[18] in the Wold.[16]

Etymology

The word wold means high, open and uncultivated land in English.[19]

Portrayal in adaptations

Map of the Wold inThe Lord of the Rings Online

2013: The Lord of the Rings Online:

Added in the Riders of Rohan expansion, the Wold is the first area of Rohan that the player sets foot to, only to quickly witness the northernmost town of Langhold sacked and burned by marauding Easterlings. The town of Harwick is of great importance, being the seat of Harding, who is not only Reeve of the Wold, but also Aldor of the entire Eastemnet and thus second only to Théoden King himself.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Unfinished index for The Lord of the Rings", in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, entry Wold, p. 343
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Riders of Rohan", p. 429
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "The Great River", pp. 380-1
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Unfinished index for The Lord of the Rings", in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, entry Limlight, p. 343
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The West of Middle-earth at the End of the Third Age" [map]
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Second Age"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Appendix C: The Boundaries of Lórien"
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan", "(iv) The Tradition of Isildur"
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "The House of Eorl"
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Third Age"
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The Hunt for the Ring", (i) On the Journey of the Black Riders according to the account that Gandalf gave to Frodo
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Great Years", entry for the year 3019, February 16, p. 1092
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Uruk-hai"
  14. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Riders of Rohan"
  15. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Muster of Rohan", p. 804
  16. 16.0 16.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "Many Partings", p. 979
  17. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Great Years", entry for the year 3019, March 11, p. 1093
  18. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Great Years", entry for the year 3019, March 12, p. 1093
  19. Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 344