Anórien

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Anórien
Region/fief
Mark Fisher - Anorien.png
General Information
LocationNorth of the White Mountains, between the Mering Stream in the west and Minas Tirith in the east
TypeRegion/fief
DescriptionThe royal lands around Minas Tirith
RegionsDrúadan Forest, Firien Wood
Major townsOsgiliath, Minas Anor (later Minas Tirith)
People and History
InhabitantsPrimarily Gondorians (A remnant of the Drúedain lived in the Drúadan Forest)
EventsSiege of Gondor, Battle of the Pelennor Fields

Anórien was a region and fiefdom of Gondor.

Geography[edit]

When Isildur and Anárion divided the South Kingdom of Gondor among them Anárion took the region between the river Erui and the river Anduin to Mount Mindolluin and then west to the Firienholt (back then called the North Wood).[1] Thus Anórien originally included Minas Tirith (back then called Minas Anor) and the land between the river Erui and the river Anduin.[2] It is unknown if and when the land between the eastern end of the White Mountains and the river Anduin between the falls of Rauros and the river Erui ceased to be a part of Anórien and if the land between the Erui and the Anduin became a part of Lebennin, Lossarnach or another region.[3]

After Calenardhon was given to the Éothéod to become the Kingdom of Rohan, the western borders of Anórien were the Mering Stream and the Mouths of the Entwash,[4] the Anduin and the west-cliffs of the Emyn Muil[5].

The land contained the Drúadan Forest and fertile farmlands. The Great West Road traversed the fief. The Warning beacons of Gondor were located to the south of the road.[4]

History[edit]

During the Elder Days, the region was occupied by Pre-Númenóreans.[6] These were separated relatives of the House of Haleth while the Edain migrated to the west during the First Age. The aboriginal Woses fled to the forests of that region, hunted by the Men of Darkness.[7]

At the end of the Second Age, the region was given to Anárion as part of the Realms in Exile and was named 'Anórien' after him. Anárion built Minas Anor on Amon Tirith of the Mindolluin.

Peoples from Anórien, as well as from Ithilien and Calenardhon joined with Eldacar against Castamir in the Kin-strife.[8]

As the Great Plague spread, cities were evacuated and many fled to Ithilien and Anórien.

Steward Túrin II fortified the isle of Cair Andros to defend Anórien.[9]

By the time of the War of the Ring, Anórien was one of the few fiefs which was dominated by the Dúnedain of Gondor; specifically, in Minas Tirith and the adjacent townlands where Sindarin was still known and used as a daily language.[10][11] It would appear that the western part of Anórien (from Min-Rimmon westward) was deserted or depopulated by this time, as tidings of the coronation of Aragorn went out into "all parts of Gondor, from Min-Rimmon even to Pinnath Gelin and the far coasts of the sea".[12]

When Sauron released a secondary force from the Morannon, they overwhelmed the defenders of Cair Andros, and used the island to cross into Anórien. They blocked the eastward progress of the Rohirrim as they rode to Gondor's aid, though after the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, Elfhelm and 3000 Rohirrim chased them down and pushed them back out of Anórien.[13]

Etymology[edit]

Anórien is a Sindarin name.[14] It means "Sunlending" in the language of the Rohirrim.[2] Its meaning in modern English is not glossed, but Paul Strack suggests that it literally means "Sun-lands" and is a compound of Anor ("sun") and the plural -ien of the place name suffix -ian(d).[14]

The name does not refer to a climate characterised by the sun, but to the 'heraldic' name of Anárion.[2]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Rivers and Beacon-hills of Gondor" (edited by Carl F. Hostetter), in Vinyar Tengwar, Number 42, July 2001, entry Arnen, p. 18
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, entry Sunlending, p. 776 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Nomen" defined multiple times with different content
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Unfinished index for The Lord of the Rings", in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, entry Gondor, "anciently including ... Anorien between Entwash and the White Mts. and all the land betw west of Anduin from Rauros to river Erui", p. 17
  4. 4.0 4.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "Map of Rohan, Gondor, and Mordor"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan", "(iii) Cirion and Eorl", "The bounds of the realm of Eorl"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The Drúedain"
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "The Númenorean Kings", "Gondor and the Heirs of Anárion"
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "VII. The Heirs of Elendil"
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix F, "The Languages and Peoples of the Third Age", "Of Men"
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "II. The Appendix on Languages"
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Steward and the King"
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Last Debate"
  14. 14.0 14.1 Paul Strack, "S. Anórien loc.", Eldamo - An Elvish Lexicon (accessed 6 February 2022)
Route of the Fellowship of the Ring
Aragorn, Gimli and Legolas
Rivendell · Eregion · Caradhras · Moria · Lothlórien · Caras Galadhon · Anduin · Parth Galen · Amon Hen · Eastemnet · Fangorn Forest · Rohan · Edoras · Hornburg · Isengard · Dunharrow · Paths of the Dead · Gondor · Erech · Lamedon · Linhir · Lebennin · Pelargir · Minas Tirith · Osgiliath · Cross-roads · Ithilien · Dagorlad · Black Gate · Field of Cormallen · Cair Andros · Gondor · Minas Tirith · Anórien · Rohan · Edoras · Isengard
Boromir
Rivendell · Eregion · Caradhras · Moria · Lothlórien · Caras Galadhon · Anduin · Parth Galen · Amon Hen
Frodo and Sam
Rivendell · Eregion · Caradhras · Moria · Lothlórien · Caras Galadhon · Anduin · Parth Galen · Amon Hen · Emyn Muil · Dead Marshes · Black Gate · Ithilien · Henneth Annûn · Cross-roads · Morgul Vale · Stairs of Cirith Ungol · Cirith Ungol · Shelob's Lair · Tower of Cirith Ungol · Mordor · Morgai · Plateau of Gorgoroth · Mount Doom · Field of Cormallen · Cair Andros · Gondor · Minas Tirith · Anórien · Rohan · Edoras · Isengard
Gandalf
Rivendell · Eregion · Caradhras · Moria · Celebdil† · Lothlórien · Fangorn Forest · Edoras · Hornburg · Isengard · Rohan · Anórien · Gondor · Minas Tirith · Osgiliath · Cross-roads · Ithilien · Dagorlad · Black Gate · Field of Cormallen · Cair Andros · Gondor · Minas Tirith · Anórien · Rohan · Edoras · Isengard
Merry
Rivendell · Eregion · Caradhras · Moria · Lothlórien · Caras Galadhon · Anduin · Parth Galen · Amon Hen · Emyn Muil · Eastemnet · Fangorn Forest · Wellinghall · Derndingle · Isengard · Hornburg · Dunharrow · Drúadan Forest · Gondor · Minas Tirith · Anórien · Rohan · Edoras · Isengard
Pippin
Rivendell · Eregion · Caradhras · Moria · Lothlórien · Caras Galadhon · Anduin · Amon Hen · Parth Galen · Emyn Muil · Eastemnet · Fangorn Forest · Wellinghall · Derndingle · Isengard · Rohan · Anórien · Gondor · Minas Tirith · Osgiliath · Cross-roads · Ithilien · Dagorlad · Black Gate · Field of Cormallen · Gondor · Cair Andros · Minas Tirith · Anórien · Rohan · Edoras · Isengard