Baggins family

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The Baggins family were a remarkable and rich Hobbit family from The Shire which included two Ring-bearers: Frodo and Bilbo.

History

The Baggins clan traced their origin to the first recorded Baggins, one Balbo Baggins, who was born in or near Hobbiton in S.R. 1167.

The Baggins family lived all around in the Shire, mostly in or near the town of Hobbiton. They were seen as well to do and respectable, as well as very predictable, for it was said one could tell what a Baggins would say on any occasion without even the bother of asking him.[1] They had many connections to other aristocratic Hobbit families, like the Brandybucks and the Tooks; other branches were the Sackville-Bagginses and the Chubb-Bagginses.

Although generally speaking they never had any adventures or did anything unexpected,[2] its members with Took blood were more adventurous. A notable example was Bilbo Baggins who set out on the quest for Erebor with Gandalf the Grey and thirteen Dwarves; during his absence he was presumed dead and the headship of the family was in doubt, with Otho of the Sackville-Baggins branch having the ambition of being head of two major families, until Bilbo returned alive.[3][4] He was seen as odd or queer, but also extremely rich.

Bilbo adopted his "nephew" Frodo Baggins, who inherited the smial of Bag End (which did not sit well with Otho[3]) after Bilbo left. Frodo himself was involved in the quest which ended the War of the Ring.

Other Bagginses include the descendants of Posco Baggins, as well as Peregrin Took and Meriadoc Brandybuck, who had maternal Baggins blood.

In S.R. 1421 both Bilbo and Frodo went over the Sea but it was still impossible to presume death, so when Samwise Gamgee was elected Mayor of the Shire, he established a rule of succession and inheritance in such situations. Presumably Ponto Baggins II became the head of the family.[4]

Genealogy

Family tree of the Bagginses of Hobbiton

Showing the prominent members of the Baggins clan.[5] The figures after the names are those of birth (and death where that is recorded). A dashed line indicates marriage, or when extended vertically, indicates a line of descent with one or more generations not shown. Names in italics signify those who attended Bilbo's Farewell Party on 22 September S.R. 1401. Names in parentheses represent significant hobbits related to the Baggins.

Balbo Baggins
1167-1258
Berylla Boffin
Mungo
1207-1300
Laura Grubb
Pansy
1212
Fastolph Bolger
Ponto
1216-1311
Mimosa Bunce
Largo
1220-1312
Tanta Hornblower
Lily
1222-1312
Togo Goodbody
Bungo
1246-1326
Belladonna Took
Belba
1256-1356
Rudigar Bolger
Longo
1260-1350
Camellia Sackville
Linda
1262-1363
Bodo Proudfoot
Bingo
1264-1360
Chica Chubb
Rosa
1256
Hildigrim Took
Polo
Fosco
1264-1360
Ruby Bolger
Bilbo
1290
[Note 1][6]
Otho Sackville-Baggins
1310-1412
Lobelia Bracegirdle
(Odo Proudfoot)
1304-1405
Falco Chubb-Baggins
1303-1399
Posco
1302
Gilly Brownlock
Prisca
1306
Wilibald Bolger
Dora
1302-1406
Drogo
1308-1380
[Note 2][7]
Primula Brandybuck
Dudo
1311-1409
Lotho
1364-1419
[Note 3][8]
(Olo)
1346-1435
Filibert Bolger
Poppy
1344
Ponto
1346
Porto
1348
Peony
1350
Milo Burrows
Frodo
1368
[Note 4][6]
Griffo Boffin
Daisy
1350
(Sancho)
1390
(Peregrin Took)
(Meriadoc Brandybuck)
Angelica
1381
(Mosco)
1387
(Moro)
1391
(Myrtle)
1393
(Minto)
1396
(Various Goodbodies)

Family tree notes

  1. Of Bag End, left the Shire in S.R. 1421 and said to have passed over the sea
  2. Drogo and Primula went boating on the Brandywine River and drowned together.
  3. Murdered by Gríma Wormtongue
  4. Left the Shire in S.R. 1421 and said to have passed over the sea


Etymology

The name Baggins is a translation in English of the actual Westron name Labingi, which was believed to be related to the Westron word laban, "bag". The name is associated with Bag End.[9]

The name Baggins is translated in most translations of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, often keeping the "bag" or "sack" meaning:[10]

  • In the Breton translation it is Sac'heg.
  • In the Cornish translation it is Baggyn.
  • In the Czech translation it is Pytlík.
  • In the Dutch translation it is Balings.
  • In the Estonian translation it is Paunaste.
  • In the Finnish translation it is Reppuli.
  • In the French translation it is Sacquet in most books, but Bessac in the new Hobbit translation.
  • In the Frisian translation it is Balsma.
  • In the German translation the family name is Beutlin.
  • In the Hungarian translation it is Zsákos.
  • In the Norwegian translation it is Lommelun.
  • In one of the Polish translations it is Bagosz.
  • In the Portuguese translation it is Bolseiro.
  • In the Slovak translation it is Bublík.
  • In the Slovene translation it is Bisagin.
  • In the Spanish translation it is Bolsón.
  • In the Swedish translation it is Secker; Bagger in the old translation by Åke Ohlmarks.

Inspiration

Intended to recall bag — cf. Bilbo’s conversation with Smaug in The H. [Chapter 12] — and meant to be associated (by hobbits) with Bag End...

References