Salmar

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Salmar
Maia
Kent Burles - Salmar.png
"Salmar" by Kent Burles
Biographical Information
PronunciationQ, [ˈsalmar]
AffiliationUlmo
Notable forMaking of the Ulumúri
Physical Description
GenderMale
GalleryImages of Salmar

Salmar was a Maia[1] who entered Arda with Ulmo. He was the maker of the Ulumúri, the great horns of Ulmo which produce the music of the sea.[2]

Etymology[edit]

The meaning of the name Salmar in Quenya is unclear. But, see below for the meaning of his name in the early mythology.

Other versions of the legendarium[edit]

Salmar, also called Noldorin, was a Vala in the early version of the legendarium in The Book of Lost Tales.

He entered the world with Ulmo,[3] and afterwards dwelt in Valmar. There he would often play music on his harp and lyre, sitting beneath Laurelin, and Ómar-Amillo his twin brother would sing as he played.[4]

When the Valar decided to oust Melko from his fortress in Utumna, he joined the rest of them in their attack.[5] Some time later when the Elves awoke, he established a friendship with the Noldoli, whom he loved.[6]

After the Two Trees were destroyed, it was Salmar who first noticed that in Vána's lamentation for them, there was still joy in her voice. When he pointed it out to them, the rest of the Valar gathered there heard the words: I-kal'antúlien (meaning "Light hath returned"), since Vána's tears caused a final shoot of Laurelin to spring forth.[7]

Much later, after the Fall of Gondolin, when the Valar finally decided to wage war on Melko in the Great Lands and free the enslaved Gnomes, Salmar came with them. In the ensuing Battle of Tasarinan, Salmar barely escaped;[8] following his escape he went to the Iron Mountains looking for the Gnomes and to find their place of imprisonment.[9]

Nothing else is known about his future, except that he eventually returned to Valinor.[10][note 1][11][note 2][12]

In one text though, it is said that he led the Gnomes back to Tol Eressëa after the war with Melko.[13]

Early etymology[edit]

Salmar is a Qenya name, derived from salma ("lyre, small harp").[14]

Other names[edit]

The Gnomish cognate of Salmar is Salvor.[14]

Likewise, both Noldorin and Lirillo (another name by which he was known by) are also Qenya names: the first probably arising from his association with the Noldoli;[15] the second meaning "Valu of the Song", containing either glîr ("a song, poem") or lir- ("sing") + masculine ending -illo.[14]

The Gnomish equivalent of Noldorin is Goldriel[note 3][16], and that of Lirillo is Glirlos.[14]

Another name for the character was Avlon.[17] It is in Gnomish, but its meaning is unclear.

Early genealogy[edit]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SALMAR
 
Ómar

Inspiration[edit]

The characters of Salmar (Lirillo), Ómar (Amillo), and Erinti were likely inspired by J.R.R. Tolkien himself, his brother Hilary Tolkien, and Tolkien's wife Edith Bratt, respectively.[18]

For more information, see: Lirillion.

Notes

  1. In an early, rejected entry in Qenyaqetsa, it is said that Salmar, together with his brother Amillo and the Vala Erinti left Valinor to live in Tol Eressëa, being the only three of the Valar that have done so.
  2. Salmar (Noldorin) was supposed to fight Melko along with Tulkas in the Battle of the Silent Pools, in which Melko was captured - but his presence there was struck out.
  3. Goldriel was replaced by Golthadriel, but subsequently both terms were struck out.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names", entry "Salmar"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Beginning of Days"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "III. The Coming of the Valar and the Building of Valinor", p. 66
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "III. The Coming of the Valar and the Building of Valinor", p. 75
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "IV. The Chaining of Melko", p. 101
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "V. The Coming of the Elves and the Making of Kôr", p. 126
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "VIII. The Tale of the Sun and Moon", p. 184
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "III. The Fall of Gondolin", p. 154
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "VI. The History of Eriol or Ælfwine and the End of the Tales", p. 279
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "VI. The History of Eriol or Ælfwine and the End of the Tales", p. 278
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne), p. 36
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "III. The Fall of Gondolin": "Notes and Commentary", pp. 219-220
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne), p. 67
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Early Qenya and The Valmaric Script", in Parma Eldalamberon XIV (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), p. 13
  15. Paul Strack, "ᴱQ. Noldorin m.", Eldamo - An Elvish Lexicon (accessed 23 March 2022)
  16. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "I. The Cottage of Lost Play": "Notes and Commentary", p. 22
  17. J.R.R. Tolkien, "I-Lam na-Ngoldathon: The Grammar and Lexicon of the Gnomish Tongue", in Parma Eldalamberon XI (edited by Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne), p. 41
  18. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Early Qenya and The Valmaric Script", in Parma Eldalamberon XIV (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), "The Names of the Valar", note 23, p. 15
Ainur
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Maiar   Arien · Eönwë · Ilmarë · Melian · Ossë · Salmar · Tilion · Uinen
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