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Húrin

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Húrin Thalion
Adan
Kimberly - Hurin Thalion.jpg
"Hurin Thalion" by Kimberly
Biographical Information
Other namesThalion (S), Úmarth (S)
TitlesLord of Dor-lómin
LocationDor-lómin, Brethil, Gondolin, Thangorodrim (imprisoned)
AffiliationUnion of Maedhros
LanguageMannish dialect, Sindarin
BirthF.A. 441
Dor-lómin
RuleF.A. 462 - 472
DeathF.A. 502? (aged 61)
Belegaer (suicide)
Family
HouseHouse of Hador
ParentageGaldor & Hareth
SiblingsHuor
SpouseMorwen Eledhwen
ChildrenTúrin, Lalaith & Nienor
Physical Description
GenderMale
Hair colorBlond/Grey
Eye colorBlue[1][2]
WeaponrySword and axe
SteedArroch
GalleryImages of Húrin Thalion
". . . but he was shorter in stature than other men of his kin; in this he took after his mother's people, but in all else he was like Hador, his grandfather, strong in body and fiery of mood. But the fire in him burned steadily, and he had great endurance of will."
The Children of Húrin, The Childhood of Túrin

Húrin Thalion ("the Steadfast", "the Strong"), was the last Lord of Dor-lómin and one of the great heroes of Men during the First Age. He was the eldest son of Galdor and Hareth and the older brother of Huor. He was the father of Túrin, Urwen and Nienor.

Húrin was regarded as "the mightiest of warriors of mortal Men"[3] but also known for being the titular character of the tale, Narn i Chîn Húrin, "The Tale of the Children of Húrin". In the tale he was captured by Morgoth at the Nirnaeth Arnoediad and forced to reveal the secret location of Gondolin. He refused so the Dark Lord cursed his kin and imprisoned in Thangorodrim he watched the curse befall his children. The curse led to some of the greatest successes and tragedies of the First Age.

Contents

[edit] History

[edit] Early years

Hurin and Huor are landing in Gondolin by Mysilvergreen

Húrin was born in F.A. 441 in Hithlum.[4] His father was Galdor and his father Hador Lórindol, founder of the House of Hador.[5] His mother was Hareth of Brethil who was the daughter of Halmir the lord of the Haladin.[6] In his youth, him and his younger brother Huor were raised in the forest of Brethil by Haldir their uncle. In 456,[7] the brothers joined a company of scouts but were separated from them after an Orc ambush. They were pursued to the ford of Brithiach and were saved by the Vala Ulmo who caused a mist to rise and the two escaped into Dimbar. From there, Eagles flew them to the hidden city Gondolin. King Turgon welcomed the brothers, remembering their grandfather Hador who was an Elf-friend as well as the words of Ulmo who told him to deal kindly to the House of Hador. Húrin remained with Turgon for a time until he and his brother wished to return to their people. Turgon was reluctant to let the brothers leave but the king granted their wish and the brothers swore oaths of secrecy.[8] They returned to Dor-lómin sometime before 462.

[edit] Lord of Dor-lómin

Húrin by Steamey

In F.A. 462,[9] orcs invaded Hithlum and Galdor was slain defending the fortress of Eithel Sirion. Húrin who had newly come to manhood took command and drove off the Orcs. He returned to rule as the third Lord of Dor-lómin. Two years later he married Morwen Eledhwen of the House of Bëor.[6] Their son Túrin was born shortly thereafter, followed by a daughter, Urwen. Urwen, better known as Lalaith ("Laughter"), died of the plague when she was three.

In 472, the alliance known as Union of Maedhros led Elves, Dwarves, and Men to assault Angband. Húrin led his folk to join the host led by the High King Fingon. In the battle, later named the Nirnaeth Arnoediad or Battle of Unnumbered Tears, the Union were defeated by the hosts of Morgoth. Many Elves and Men perished, including Fingon who was slain by a Balrog. With their liege lord slain and facing a rout, Húrin and Huor convinced Turgon to withdraw and keep the secret of Gondolin. To defend his escape, the Men of Dor-lómin formed a rearguard near the Pass of Sirion and held it giving as much time for Turgon to gather the remainder of Fingon's people and the host of Gondolin to escape. The location of Gondolin remained secret but for the Men of the Dor-lómin this was their last stand for they would not forsake the Northlands and were slaughtered by the hosts of Morgoth. By the Fen of Serech, Huor was slain by an arrow through the eye, but Húrin remained steadfast crying Aurë entuluva! for each foe he slew with his axe. He fought until he was buried under the weight of bodies of his enemies, then Gothmog bound him and dragged him towards Angband.[10]

[edit] The Curse of Morgoth

The Words of Húrin and Morgoth by Alan Lee

Húrin was brought before Morgoth, for he had learnt from his spies that Húrin was friends with Turgon, and was tortured for the secret of Gondolin's location. When he would not break, Morgoth cursed him and all his kin. The Dark Lord then chained Húrin to a chair high on the slopes of Thangorodrim where, through Morgoth's sorcery, he could watch the tragedies that would befall his family.[11] However Morgoth concealed much of Túrin's deeds and what Húrin saw was contorted, lies mixed with the truth.

'But upon all whom you love my thought shall weigh as a cloud of Doom, and it shall bring them down into darkness and despair. Wherever they go, evil shall arise. Whenever they speak, their words shall bring ill counsel. Whatsoever they do shall turn against them. They shall die without hope, cursing both life and death.'
The Children of Húrin, The Words of Húrin and Morgoth

For 28 years,[3] Húrin watched the curse come upon Túrin and Nienor, his daughter born shortly after his capture, and to those that they encounter. For instance Túrin's actions led to the destruction of Nargothrond, one of the last kingdoms of the Noldor. Now only Gondolin remained.

[edit] Wanderings

After the death of his children Morgoth released Húrin, where he hoped he could further his malice. The broken man first returned to Hithlum, which was now ruled by Easterlings. Finding none of his kin, he travelled with outlaws to the mountains of Echoriath, searching for the entrance to Gondolin. At first Turgon refused him, but later recanted and sent Eagles to bring him to Gondolin. Húrin had already left for the Forest of Brethil, but Morgoth's curse had already ensnared Gondolin, for the Dark Lord's spies now knew the general location of the Hidden Kingdom.[3]

In the Forest of Brethil he found the graves of his children. His wife, Morwen, was there and she died shortly after. After burying his wife, Húrin was taken by march-wardens to the settlement of Ephel Brandir, the home of the People of Haleth, with whom Túrin lived the last years of his life. Angry and grieving, he turned the People of Haleth against one another and ruined Ephel Brandir.[12]

Húrin Finds Morwen by Ted Nasmith

Húrin continued on to the ruins of Nargothrond, where he found the Petty-dwarf Mîm. The petty-dwarf had betrayed Túrin years ago and in revenge Húrin slaughtered him. Mîm had claimed the treasure of Nargothrond, but Húrin recovered the Nauglamír and journeyed eastwards.[3]

Húrin reached the Meres of Twilight and was taken by the Elves who guarded the western borders of Doriath in F.A. 502.[13] He was allowed to enter Menegroth, where in anger he threw the Nauglamír before King Thingol and 'thanked' him for aiding his son. Thingol's wife, Melian, finally pierced through Húrin's madness and grief revealing the truth that Morgoth hid. Shamed by his actions, he picked up the Nauglamír to give to the king as a gift and memorial, then he left Menegroth no longer a thrall of Morgoth.[3]

[edit] Death and legacy

After leaving Menegroth, it is said Húrin, "bereft of all purpose and desire", cast himself into the Great Sea.[3]

It could be argued, that Húrin partly sowed the seeds of the destruction of Doriath and Gondolin or escalated it. Furthermore Húrin's presence in Brethil led to the extinction of the House of Haleth.[14]

His life, and the lives of his children would become known as the Narn i Chîn Húrin, "The Tale of the Children of Húrin". It was written by the Mannish poet Dírhaval who lived in the Havens of Sirion and it was highly praised by the Eldar.[15] Millennia later Elrond makes a passing reference of him to Frodo at the Council of Elrond.[16]

'But if you take it freely, I will say that your choice is right; and though all the mighty Elf-friends of old, Hador, and Húrin, and Túrin, and Beren himself were assembled together, your seat should be among them.’'
The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Council of Elrond

[edit] Etymology

Húrin is Sindarin, but it is never glossed. However, in the earlier Noldorin phase of the language, the name is the combination of hûr ("vigour") + ind ("heart").[17]

[edit] Other names

Thalion is simply Sindarin for "Steadfast, Strong".[18]

When Túrin dwelt in Nargothrond, Húrin was indirectly called by him Úmarth,[19] meaning "Ill-fate".[20]

[edit] Genealogy


 
 
Bregolas
 
 
 
Halmir
 
Hador Lórindol
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belegund
 
Baragund
 
Hareth
 
Galdor of Dor-lómin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Morwen Eledhwen
 
HÚRIN THALION
 
Huor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Túrin Turambar
 
Lalaith
 
Nienor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[edit] Other versions of the legendarium

In The Book of Lost Tales, his name was Úrin.[21]

In earlier versions Húrin suffers a different fate after departing Doriath. In the Lost Tales, Úrin returns to Hísilómë (Hithlum), later dies and his shade seeks Mavwin (Morwen) and together lament over their children.[22] This also occurs in the Sketch of the Mythology except Húrin is not a shade.[23]

[edit] See also

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Narn i Hîn Húrin (The Tale of the Children of Húrin)"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Death of Túrin", p. 255
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Doriath"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §141, p. 51
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of Men into the West"
  6. 6.0 6.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §161, p. 57
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Childhood of Túrin", pp. 35-7
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §170, pp. 59-60
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad"
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Words of Húrin and Morgoth", pp. 62-5
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", pp. 291-4
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 258
  14. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 297
  15. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: II. Ælfwine and Dírhaval", pp. 311-3
  16. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "The Council of Elrond"
  17. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, Part Three: "The Etymologies", entries "ID", "KHOR"
  18. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names", entry thalion
  19. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "Túrin in Nargothrond", p. 159
  20. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names", entry amarth
  21. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, Index, entry Úrin
  22. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "II. Turambar and the Foalókë", pp. 115-6
  23. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Shaping of Middle-earth, "II. The Earliest 'Silmarillion' (The 'Sketch of the Mythology')" 14, p. 32
Húrin
House of Hador
Born: F.A. 441 Died: F.A. 502
Preceded by:
Galdor
Lord of Dor-lómin
F.A. 462472
None
Dor-lómin overrun