Caranthir

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Caranthir
Noldo
"Caranthir" by Elena Kukanova
Biographical Information
Other names"the Dark"
Morifinwë (Q, fn),
Carnistir (Q, mn)
TitlesLord of Thargelion
LocationEldamar, Thargelion (Dor Caranthir), Amon Ereb
AffiliationOath of Fëanor, Union of Maedhros
LanguageQuenya and Sindarin
BirthBetween Y.T. 1190 & 1362
Tirion
RuleF.A. 7 - 455
DeathF.A. 506
Second Kinslaying: Menegroth
Family
HouseHouse of Fëanor
ParentageFëanor & Nerdanel
SiblingsMaedhros, Maglor, Celegorm, Curufin, Amrod and Amras
SpouseUnnamed[1]
Physical Description
GenderMale
HeightTall
Hair colorDark
GalleryImages of Caranthir

Caranthir, one of the Sons of Fëanor, was also the harshest and the quickest to anger. He was known as "Caranthir the Dark".

History

The Wife of Caranthir. Art by Marya Filatova

As with the other Sons of Fëanor, Caranthir was bound by the Oath of Fëanor to recover his father's Silmarils, which had been stolen by the Dark Lord Morgoth. This oath brought the Noldor to Middle-earth near the end of the First Age.[2] Angrod of the House of Finarfin was the first messenger of the Noldor to come to King Thingol who gave his permission to the Noldor to dwell in some free lands, but not in Doriath, as he considered himself Lord of Beleriand. Angrod informed the Noldor of this during their council in Mithrim, and Maedhros laughed at Thingol's claims, remarking that Thingol had merely given them lands in which he had no power. But Caranthir despised the children of Finarfin, and spoke in anger against Angrod, saying that he ought not to have been the spokesperson of the Noldor. Maedhros rebuked him, but division between Noldor increased after the outburst.[3]

The people of Caranthir went to the furthermost East Beleriand, reaching Ered Luin, and there they became the first of Noldor to encounter the Dwarves. Caranthir disliked the Dwarves for their unloveliness, but though there was little love between the two peoples, they allied against their common enemy: Morgoth. The alliance brought great profit, for all the trading that came to Beleriand from the Dwarves went first through Caranthir's hands, and he gained great wealth.[3] Caranthir's realm was in Thargelion, and was sometimes called Dor Caranthir ("Land of Caranthir"). His abode was on the shores of Lake Helevorn.[4]

In F.A. 375, Caranthir rescued Haleth and her people, the Haladin, when they were besieged by Orcs. At last recognizing the valour of Men, he offered the Haladin a fiefdom in his lands to the North. However, Haleth's heart was proud, and wanting her people to serve no lord she thanked him but removed to the Forest of Brethil.[5]

In the Dagor Bragollach, Caranthir was forced to retreat and joined the remnant of his people to the scattered folk of Amrod and Amras. They fled to the south and maintained a watch upon Amon Ereb, aided by the Laegil.[6]

In F.A. 463, the Easterling Ulfang led his people over the Blue Mountains, and they allied themselves with Maedhros. They swore allegiance to Caranthir, whom they followed,[6] and were given land in Lothlann.[7]

In F.A. 472, the disaster of the Nirnaeth Arnoediad ("Battle of Unnumbered Tears") occurred, caused by the betrayal of the people of Ulfang, and the sons of Fëanor were scattered.[8]

In F.A. 506, he perished along with his brothers Celegorm and Curufin during the Second Kinslaying, the attack by the Sons of Fëanor on Menegroth in an attempt to recover a Silmaril from King Dior Eluchíl of Doriath.[9]

Etymology

Caranthir is the Sindarized version of his mother-name Carnistir ("Red-face"), being the compound of caran + thir.[10] He was given this name as he inherited his mother's rudddy complexion,[11] though not his grandfather's coppery-red hair.[12]

Caranthir's father-name was Morifinwë ("Dark Finwë"), as he was black-haired as his paternal grandfather. The short version of the name was Moryo.[11]

An earlier variant of his name was Cranthir (N. "perfect");[13]:161 it was alternatively spelled as Cranthor.

Genealogy

Mahtan
b. Y.T.
 
Míriel
d. Y.T. 1170
 
Finwë
d. Y.T. 1495
 
Indis
b. Y.T.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nerdanel
b. Y.T.
 
 
 
Fëanor
Y.T. 1169 - 1497
 
Findis
b. Y.T.
 
Fingolfin
Y.T. 1190 - F.A. 456
 
Írimë
b. Y.T.
 
Finarfin
b. Y.T. 1230
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Maedhros
d. F.A. 587
 
Maglor
b. Y.T.
 
Celegorm
d. F.A. 506
 
CARANTHIR
d. F.A. 506
 
Curufin
d. F.A. 506
 
Amrod
d. F.A. 538
 
Amras
d. F.A. 538
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Celebrimbor
d. S.A. 1697
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Other versions of the legendarium

In The Nauglafring, from the second volume of The History of Middle-earth, he dies beside Celegorm in the attack on Dior's realm.[14]

While in the published Silmarillion Caranthir is recorded as the fourth son of Fëanor, in The Shibboleth of Fëanor Curufin is explicitly numbered as the fourth.[11] This would then imply Caranthir to be the fifth son instead.

In The Nature of Middle-earth, a footnote regarding Finrod's epessë, Felegund, states that "This nick-name was probably actually given to Finrod not by Dwarves but by the Sons of Fëanor at least partly in derision. There was no great love between the Sons of Fëanor and the children of Finarphin, though they hid their enmity at need. (As when Curufin and Caranthir dwelt in the shelter of Nargothrond after the defeat of the Elves by Morgoth in the North). Moreover the Sons of Fëanor had much communication with the Dwarves of Nogrod and Belegost."[15] It may be assumed that this was intended to refer to Celegorm instead.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "X. Of Dwarves and Men", "Notes", p. 318 (note 7)
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Flight of the Noldor"
  3. 3.0 3.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Return of the Noldor"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Beleriand and its Realms"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of Men into the West"
  6. 6.0 6.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part One. The Grey Annals"
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad"
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Doriath"
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, "From The Shibboleth of Fëanor" (edited by Carl F. Hostetter), in Vinyar Tengwar, Number 41, July 2000, p. 10
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "XI. The Shibboleth of Fëanor", "The names of the Sons of Fëanor", p. 353
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "XI. The Shibboleth of Fëanor", "The names of the Sons of Fëanor", p. 366
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Alphabet of Rúmil & Early Noldorin Fragments", in Parma Eldalamberon XIII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden)
  14. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "IV. The Nauglafring", pp. 241-242
  15. J.R.R. Tolkien, Carl F. Hostetter (ed.), The Nature of Middle-earth, "Part Three. The World, its Lands, and its Inhabitants: VII. The Founding of Nargothrond", p. 397, fn1
Caranthir
House of Fëanor
Cadet branch of the House of Finwë
Born: Between Y.T. 1190 & 1362 Died: F.A. 506
None
Title established
Lord of Thargelion
F.A. 7455
None
Realm destroyed