Celebrimbor

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Celebrimbor
Noldo
Angus McBride - Celebrimbor.gif
"Celebrimbor" by Angus McBride
Biographical Information
PronunciationS, [ˌkɛlɛˈbrɪmbɔr]
Other namesTelperinquar/Telpinquar (Q)
TitlesLord of Eregion
LocationEldamar
Nargothrond
Eregion
AffiliationGwaith-i-Mírdain
LanguageQuenya & Sindarin
BirthBefore Y.T. 1495[1]
Aman
RuleS.A. 750 - 1697 (for 947 years)
DeathS.A. 1697 (aged 2,334+)
Ost-in-Edhil (during the War of the Elves and Sauron)
Notable forCreating the Three Rings
Inscribing the Doors of Durin
Family
HouseHouse of Fëanor
ParentageCurufin
Physical Description
GenderMale
GalleryImages of Celebrimbor
"In Eregion the craftsmen of the Gwaith-i-Mírdain, the People of the Jewel-smiths, surpassed in cunning all that have ever wrought, save only Fëanor himself; and indeed greatest in skill among them was Celebrimbor, son of Curufin [...]"
The Silmarillion, "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age"

Celebrimbor was the son of Curufin,[2] the fourth son of Fëanor,[3][4][5] and thus a descendant of Fëanor[6][7]. Aside from his grandfather, Celebrimbor was the greatest craftsman in the history of Middle-earth, and his forging of the Rings of Power led to the dominion and eventual downfall of Sauron in the War of the Ring.

History[edit]

First Age[edit]

Life in Aman[edit]

Family by Marya Filatova

Celebrimbor was born in Aman sometime during the Years of the Trees. Among Fëanor's seven sons, Celebrimbor's father Curufin was the chief inheritor of Fëanor's temperament and skills in craftsmanship[8] - those skills were passed down to Celebrimbor as well, but not the temperament, which he possibly inherited rather from his mother, whose name is unknown.[1]

In Y.T. 1495,[9] Morgoth and Ungoliant destroyed the Two Trees of Valinor, which were the chief light source in Aman.[10] Morgoth also slew Fëanor's father Finwë, and stole the Silmarils, the three holy jewels which were Fëanor's greatest works.[11] Therefore, Fëanor and his sons swore a terrible oath, under Ilúvatar, to wage war against Morgoth and anyone who prevented them from recovering the Silmarils.[12]

Following the Darkening of Valinor, Fëanor convinced the majority of the Noldor to rebel against the Valar and follow him to Middle-earth.[12] In doing so, he asked the help of the Falmari, the Teleri of Aman; however, they refused, and Fëanor and his followers committed the first of the three kinslayings of Elves against Elves.[13]

Although Celebrimbor did not swear the Oath of Fëanor, it is unknown if he took part in the kinslaying. He did, however, follow the rest of the Noldor into Exile, even though his mother stayed behind with the people of Finarfin,[1] Fëanor's younger half-brother who repented and asked forgiveness from the Valar.[14]

It is also unknown if he crossed the Belegaer in a ship, with his father and grandfather, or if he followed Fingolfin across the Helcaraxë.

Life in Beleriand[edit]

Celebrimbor by Jenny Dolfen

Much of Celebrimbor's life in Beleriand after the return of the Noldor[15] and the establishment of the Siege of Angband in F.A. 60[16] is unknown, but it is possible that he stayed with his father Curufin in Himlad, a region ruled by Curufin and his brother Celegorm.[17]

However, in F.A. 455,[18] Morgoth finally broke the Siege of Angband during the Dagor Bragollach, the Battle of Sudden Flame, after which Curufin and Celegorm fled south with much of their people,[19] possibly including Celebrimbor. They took refuge in Nargothrond, an elven stronghold ruled by Finrod Felagund,[20] the eldest son of Finarfin and brother of Galadriel.[21]

During the years that Curufin and Celegorm spent in Nargothrond they had gained a lot of power, and when, in F.A. 465,[22] it was made known to them that Beren, a Man of the House of Bëor, intended to retrieve a Silmaril from the crown of Morgoth with Finrod's help, driven by their Oath they convinced the people of Nargothrond to rebel against Finrod, resulting in there only being ten elves willing to help him and Beren on their quest.[23]

In the meantime, Orodreth, Finrod's nephew,[note 1][24] took the stewardship of Nargothrond;[23] one day, however, Curufin and Celegorm went hunting with Celegorm's hound Huan and found Lúthien, daughter of Thingol King of Doriath, searching for Beren. Feigning to help her, they took her captive and brought her to Nargothrond, partly because Celegorm had become enamored with her and would have forced Thingol to give him her hand.[25] Nevertheless, Huan helped free Lúthien,[25] and eventually they also freed Beren and other thralls from Sauron's fortress at Tol-in-Gaurhoth.[26]

When these thralls returned, the people of Nargothrond perceived the two brothers' treachery, and though Orodreth would not let them be slain, he banished them from Nargothrond.[26] However, during Celebrimbor's stay in Nargothrond, he grew to love Finrod,[1] and was horrified by his father Curufin's actions. He, therefore, repudiated him, and refused to leave with him and Celegorm.[26][1]

Eventually, in F.A. 495,[27] Nargothrond fell to Morgoth's forces, and some of the survivors fled to Doriath,[28] but whether Celebrimbor fled with them, or otherwise left before the fall, is unknown.

Nothing else is said of Celebrimbor's actions or whereabouts during the rest of the First Age, though it is possible that he eventually found his way to the Mouths of Sirion or the Isle of Balar, some of the last elven refuges left in Beleriand before the arrival of the Host of Valinor and the beginning of the War of Wrath.

Second Age[edit]

A legend says that during the Second Age Celebrimbor was in love with Galadriel who was pained at the state of Middle-earth. Celebrimbor remade another version of the Elessar at her behest, but it was with less power than the original.[29]

During the Second Age, he was lord of the elves of Ost-in-Edhil in Eregion. He was also the head of the Gwaith-i-Mírdain, a guild of elven craftsmen. Their skill was so renowned that they gained the admiration and friendship of the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm. Together with the dwarf Narvi, Celebrimbor crafted the Doors of Durin that guarded the West-gate of the Dwarven kingdom.[30]

Rings of Power[edit]

Annatar and Celebrimbor by Soni Alcorn-Hender

At around S.A. 1200 Sauron, calling himself Annatar (the "Lord of Gifts") and claiming to be an emissary of the Valar, arrived in Ost-in-Edhil, and offered his knowledge to the Gwaith-i-Mírdain.[31]

Under the guidance and instruction of Annatar, Celebrimbor and the Gwaith-i-Mírdain made several lesser rings, before embarking on the project to make the Rings of Power. A legend says that Celebrimbor gave one of those rings to King Durin III who reigned in Khazad-dûm.[32]

Using the knowledge gained from Annatar, Celebrimbor also created Three Rings by himself, the greatest and fairest of the Rings of Power. These rings were thus free of Sauron's corrupting influence, for only Celebrimbor himself touched them. Celebrimbor named the rings Vilya, Narya, and Nenya after the principal elements of air, fire, and water, respectively. Vilya and Narya were sent by Celebrimbor to Gil-galad and Círdan, respectively, in Lindon, and Nenya to Galadriel in Lothlórien.

Around S.A. 1600, Sauron secretly forged the One Ring in Orodruin, which would enable him to rule Middle-earth by claiming dominance over all the Rings of Power and their bearers. However, when Sauron put on the One Ring with the intention of dominating the wills of those wearing the lesser rings, the elves who bore the Three instantly became aware of Sauron's deceit and his plan. He then prepared for war.

Fight against Sauron and death[edit]

Sauron retaliated by attacking Eregion in S.A. 1695, laying waste to the realm. In the Sack of Eregion, the nine were taken and Celebrimbor was forced under torture to disclose where the seven were held, but he would not reveal the whereabouts of the three elvish rings. Sauron captured the other rings and used them as instruments of evil in later years, particularly against Men.

Death of Celebrimbor by Abe Papakhian

Celebrimbor died from his torment in S.A. 1697,[33] the last direct descendant of the line of Fëanor, with the possible exception of Maglor. His body, shot with arrows, was hung upon a pole and carried by the forces of Sauron as a banner as they assaulted the Elves.[34]

Renowned works[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The name Celebrimbor is in Sindarin, meaning "Silver-fist"; it is comprised of the elements celebrin ("like silver in hue or worth") + paur ("fist, closed hand"),[35] with the ending -bor in Celebrimbor being a suffixal form of paur.[36]

Its Quenya cognate is Telperinquar or Telpinquar.[35]

For another, later etymology that contradicts the origins of the character of Celebrimbor as seen in The Lord of the Rings, see below.

Genealogy[edit]

Mahtan
b. Y.T.
 
Míriel
d. Y.T. 1170
 
Finwë
d. Y.T. 1495
 
Indis
b. Y.T.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nerdanel
b. Y.T.
 
 
 
Fëanor
Y.T. 1169 - 1497
 
Findis
b. Y.T.
 
Fingolfin
Y.T. 1190 - F.A. 456
 
Írimë
b. Y.T.
 
Finarfin
b. Y.T. 1230
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Maedhros
d. F.A. 587
 
Maglor
b. Y.T.
 
Celegorm
d. F.A. 506
 
Caranthir
d. F.A. 506
 
Curufin
d. F.A. 506
 
Amrod
d. F.A. 538
 
Amras
d. F.A. 538
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CELEBRIMBOR
d. S.A. 1697
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Other versions of the legendarium[edit]

The History of The Lord of the Rings[edit]

The character of Celebrimbor first appears in a draft chapter of The Lord of the Rings called The Mines of Moria (from 1939[37]),[38] which would later become the chapter A Journey in the Dark in The Fellowship of the Ring as published.[note 2][39]

There, as in The Lord of the Rings, he is only mentioned by name when Gandalf was reading the inscription on the Doors of Durin:[38]

"They merely say: The Doors of Durin Lord of Moria. Speak friends and enter. And underneath very small and now faint is: Narfi made them. Celebrimbor of Hollin drew these signs."

The name Celebrimbor was also added to The Etymologies, a linguistic work from the late 1930s, at around the same time. There, the name is given under the root KWAR ("clutching hand, fist"), and Celebrimbor's name was explained as meaning "Silver-fist" in Noldorin (which was a precursor language to Sindarin).[40]

However, even though no origin of Celebrimbor was published until the second edition of The Lord of the Rings in 1966, Tolkien did in fact write one in the 1950s, which can be found in the next section of the article.

Concerning Galadriel & Celeborn and The Elessar[edit]

The first known origin story of Celebrimbor was written by Tolkien in c. 1955, occurring in a text called Concerning Galadriel & Celeborn. There, Celebrimbor was described as an Elf of Gondolin (and one of Turgon's "greatest artificers"), who, after the end of the First Age and the overthrow of Morgoth, became a follower of Celeborn and Galadriel,[41] who were regarded as the "High Lord and Lady of all the Eldar of the West".[42]

After the establishment of Eregion,[note 3] Celebrimbor became the "chief craftsman of Eregion" with an "almost 'dwarvish' obsession with crafts", and befriended the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm, of whom a dwarven craftsman called Narvi was his greatest friend[41] - from that friendship both Eregion and Khazad-dûm profited greatly.

In c. S.A. 1000, Sauron established himself in Mordor, and sent emissaries to Eriador, before finally appearing there himself, in his fairest form, in S.A. 1200. However, he was rejected by Gil-galad in Lindon, and after heading to Eregion, was likewise rejected by Galadriel and Celeborn, the original rulers of Eregion in this conception of the legendarium.[43]

But even though Celeborn and Galadriel (who he perceived to be his chief obstacle) rejected him, Sauron, posing as an emissary of the Valar, nonetheless managed to convince Celebrimbor and the rest of the Noldorin smiths of Eregion, who by this time have formed a powerful guild called the Gwaith-i-Mírdain, to accept his help in the forging of the Rings of Power;[44] here Tolkien states that the story of Fëanor was repeated.

Therefore, Celebrimbor and his followers (under the influence of Sauron) rebelled against Galadriel and Celeborn,[note 4] and, sometime between S.A. 1350 and 1400, Galadriel withdrew from Eregion and went to Lórinand (which would later be known as Lórien), via Khazad-dûm, and took up rule there. However, Celeborn, owing to his distrust of the Dwarves, remained in Eregion "disregarded by Celebrimbor".

In c. S.A. 1500, Sauron left Eregion, some time after the Mírdain started crafting the Rings of Power.

When in c. S.A. 1600 Sauron forged the One Ring, Celebrimbor finally discovered his true intentions, and he repented. Therefore he went to Lórinand to seek Galadriel's advice;[note 5] she advised him to hide the Three Rings (which were the three Great Rings made solely by Celebrimbor) and send them away far from Eregion, never to be used, after which Celebrimbor gave one of them (Nenya) to her keeping. Following that, he entrusted the other two rings (Vilya and Narya) to Gil-galad in Lindon.[note 6]

After Sauron learned of Celebrimbor's repentance, he invaded Eriador and besieged Eregion. And even though help was on the way, from Celeborn with his son Amroth and the Nandor of Lórinand, along with the Dwarves of Moria, and from an army sent by Gil-galad under the command of Elrond from the west, it did not arrive in time. Therefore:

Sauron breaks into Eregion and lays it waste. Celebrimbor is slain personally by Sauron, but Sauron does not get the Three Rings. His wrath now blazes. Elrond with all (the few) refugees from Eregion he can gather fight a vanguard action and draw away N.W. He founds a stronghold in Imladris.

And:

When Celeborn heard of onset of Sauron (fearing to keep the Three Rings himself) he sent one to Galadriel in Lórinand by Amroth. Celeborn makes a sortie and breaks out and joins Elrond but cannot get back.

Eldarin Hands, Fingers, and Numerals[edit]

According to a late text called Eldarin Hands, Fingers, and Numerals, from c. 1968, Tolkien changed Celebrimbor's origins from that of a grandson of Fëanor to that of a Teler of Aman (Falmar).[45][46][47]

In that version of his history, Celebrimbor, the "heroic defender of Eregion in the Second-age war against Sauron", was depicted as a great silver-smith who accompanied Celeborn in his exile to Middle-earth from Aman, along with two other Telerin elves.

During the Second Age, he moved to Eregion due to the rumours of a "marvellous metal" found in Moria, which he named mithril.[45][46][47] It is said in the text that:

In the working of this he became a rival of the Dwarves, or rather an equal, for there was great friendship between the Dwarves of Moria and Celebrimbor, and they shared their skills and craft-secrets.

However, according to his son Christopher, Tolkien most probably forgot the fact that he included Celebrimbor's origins as a descendant of Fëanor in the second edition of The Lord of the Rings (1966), and that, had he remembered it, he would not have changed it.[45]

Etymology[edit]

According to this version of his history, the name Celebrimbor is likewise in Sindarin. However, in this text, Celebrimbor is a Sindarized version of his original Telerin name Telperimpar (with Tyelpinquar being its Quenya cognate).

The name was derived from the root KWAR ("press together, squeeze, wring"), whose derivatives were: quár (Q), pār (T) and paur (S).

The text also says that it was a common name among the Teleri of Aman, who were renowned silver-smiths.[46][45][47]

Of Dwarves and Men[edit]

In a late text that Christopher Tolkien called Of Dwarves and Men (from c. 1969),[48] Tolkien changed Celebrimbor's origins yet again.[45]

Here, Celebrimbor is depicted as a Sinda who claimed descent from Daeron,[49] a famous minstrel and the chief loremaster of Doriath.[50] In that text, it is explained how in Eregion, due to the influence of Celebrimbor, the ancient runic alphabet devised by Daeron was, along with Tengwar, also known and used.

And even though in Eregion these Runes were used mostly on formal occasions, due to the contact between the Elves of Eregion and the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm, and because of the greater ease with which the Runes could be carved on stone, the Longbeard Dwarves adopted and modified them for their own use.[49]

Portrayal in adaptations[edit]

Television[edit]

2022: The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power:

Celebrimbor will be portrayed by Charles Edwards as one of the central characters of the series.[51]

Games[edit]

2014: Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor

Celebrimbor as portrayed in Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor
Celebrimbor plays a major role in the video game, serving as a wraith who is bound to an undead Gondorian Ranger, Talion, by the will of Sauron. He is voiced by Alister Duncan. He is also the main protagonist of the Bright Lord expansion, where he is revealed to have stolen the One Ring from Sauron at some point in the Second Age, and intended to use it to turn the Dark Lord's own weapons against him. However, he is corrupted by the power of the Ring and doomed to never see the Undying Lands. Though he defeats Sauron in battle, Sauron still managed to reclaim the Ring and banish Celebrimbor's spirit to an eternity as a wraith in the Unseen world. Bound to Talion, Celebrimbor grants him Elven powers to help him seek revenge for the death of his wife and son.

2017: Middle-earth: Shadow of War

Celebrimbor uses Talion to create a new ring of power so they can dominate the orc forces of Sauron's army to create one in their own service. With their army amassed they travel Sauron's Road to destroy the Dark Lord. On their way, Talion comes up against the Nazgûl Isildur and decides to free Isildur from life as a servant to Sauron. Celebrimbor, angry that Talion vanquished Isildur rather than adding his power to their army, reveals that he intends to replace Sauron instead of destroying him. Talion refuses to help him in his quest for power, so Celebrimbor removes the new ring from him. With their bond lost, Talion begins to bleed profusely and die. Celebrimbor convinces Eltariel, an Elven assassin of Galadriel, to wield the new ring and continue on to defeat Sauron. During their battle, Sauron is able to overpower them and cut Eltariel's fingers off along with the new ring. Sauron then absorbs Celebrimbor and together they become the flaming Eye of Sauron atop Barad-dûr.

Notes

  1. In the published Silmarillion, Orodreth is Finrod's brother instead of a nephew. However, in one text from the 1960s, Tolkien made Orodreth the son of Angrod, one of Finrod's brothers.
  2. Before they were envisioned as being made by Celebrimbor in The Lord of the Rings, the Rings of Power were imagined as creations of Fëanor himself.
  3. This text states that the building of Ost-in-Edhil, the capital of Eregion, was begun in S.A. 750.
  4. In this text, it is said that Celebrimbor was "secretly anxious to rival the skill and fame of Fëanor".
  5. Tolkien wrote here that they "should have destroyed all the Rings of Power at this time, 'but they failed to find the strength'".
  6. According to this text, at this time, Gil-galad gave Narya to Círdan; however, according to a later note, it is said that Gil-galad kept both rings until the War of the Last Alliance.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "X. Of Dwarves and Men", "Notes", note 7, pp. 317-8
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "X. Of Dwarves and Men", "Notes", note 7
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "XI. The Shibboleth of Fëanor", "Notes", note 22 "Curufin, his fourth and favorite son"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "XI. The Shibboleth of Fëanor", "The names of the Sons of Fëanor", "(4) [Curufin]"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names", the entries Curfin and Fëanor seem to erroneously state that he was the "fifth son" of Fëanor"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Second Age", last sentence of the third paragraph, p. 1083
  7. Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 713, the sentence that he was descended from Fëanor was added in the second edition of The Lord of the Rings in 1965
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "XI. The Shibboleth of Fëanor", "The names of the Sons of Fëanor", p. 352
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Morgoth's Ring, "The Annals of Aman": §113, p. 100
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Darkening of Valinor", p. 34
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Flight of the Noldor", p. 35
  12. 12.0 12.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Flight of the Noldor", p. 37
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Flight of the Noldor", pp. 38-9
  14. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Flight of the Noldor", p. 39
  15. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Return of the Noldor", pp. 50-1
  16. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §78, p. 36
  17. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Beleriand and its Realms", p. 58
  18. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §145, p. 52
  19. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin", pp. 73-4
  20. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin", p. 74
  21. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Eldamar and the Princes of the Eldalië", p. 26
  22. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §192, p. 65
  23. 23.0 23.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Beren and Lúthien", p. 82
  24. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "XI. The Shibboleth of Fëanor", "The parentage of Gil-galad", p. 350
  25. 25.0 25.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Beren and Lúthien", pp. 83-4
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Beren and Lúthien", p. 86
  27. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "The Grey Annals": §278, p. 86
  28. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Túrin Turambar", p. 107
  29. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Elessar
  30. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Journey in the Dark", p. 306
  31. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Second Age", entry for the year 1200, p. 1083
  32. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age"
  33. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Second Age", entry for the year 1697, p. 1083
  34. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Concerning Galadriel and Celeborn"
  35. 35.0 35.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Words, Phrases and Passages in Various Tongues in The Lord of the Rings: Eldarin Roots and Stems", in Parma Eldalamberon XVII (edited by Christopher Gilson), entry S Celebrimbor, p. 42
  36. Paul Strack, "S. Celebrimbor m.", Eldamo - An Elvish Lexicon (accessed 11 August 2022)
  37. Christina Scull and Wayne G. Hammond (2006), The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: I. Chronology, entry August-autumn 1939, p. 229
  38. 38.0 38.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Return of the Shadow, "The Story Continued: XXV. The Mines of Moria", p. 449
  39. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Treason of Isengard, "XIII. Galadriel", p. 255
  40. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, Part Three: "The Etymologies", entry KWAR-, p. 366
  41. 41.0 41.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Concerning Galadriel and Celeborn", p. 235
  42. J.R.R. Tolkien, Carl F. Hostetter (ed.), The Nature of Middle-earth, "Part Three. The World, its Lands, and its Inhabitants: XVI. Galadriel and Celeborn", p. 347
  43. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Concerning Galadriel and Celeborn", p. 236
  44. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Concerning Galadriel and Celeborn", pp. 236-7
  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 45.3 45.4 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "X. Of Dwarves and Men", "Notes", note 7, pp. 318-9
  46. 46.0 46.1 46.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Eldarin Hands, Fingers & Numerals and Related Writings — Part One" (edited by Patrick H. Wynne), in Vinyar Tengwar, Number 47, February 2005, entry 4. Q. quár, p. 8
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Carl F. Hostetter (ed.), The Nature of Middle-earth, "Part Two. Body, Mind and Spirit: III. Eldarin Hands, Fingers, and Numerals", p. 178
  48. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "X. Of Dwarves and Men", [Untitled introduction], p. 295
  49. 49.0 49.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "Of Dwarves and Men", p. 297
  50. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Sindar", p. 43
  51. Alice Jones, "Amazon’s Lord of the Rings Series Rises: Inside The Rings of Power" dated 10 February 2022, VanityFair (accessed 12 February 2022)
Celebrimbor
House of Fëanor
Born: Before Y.T. 1495 Died: S.A. 1697
None
New title
Lord of Eregion
S.A. 750 - 1697
None
Realm destroyed